Everest Expedition (South)

All inclusive price

$33500USD

Group size: 1+ Max-Altitude: 8848m
Destination: Nepal Fitness level: Adventurous and Challenging 
Arrival on: Tribhuvan International Airport (TIA) Departure from: Tribhuvan International Airport (TIA)
Meals: Breakfast in Kathmandu and All standard meals (B+L+D) during the Trek and Camping
Best Season: Spring and Autumn
Accommodation: Best lodge/Tea house Available/Camping
Trip Introduction

Mount Everest Expedition (South) is a definitive journey for the great adventure devotees. Just few adventure seekers on the planet set out to bet their own life and accomplish their dream of being at the highest point on the planet located at an elevation of 8,848 m (29,028ft) above sea level. Many climbers from around the globe attempts every year to set the record of ascending Mount Everest which is the most elevated point on the earth. Mount Everest also called “Mount Chomolungma”is a sacred mountain which holds a special place in the heart for the population in the Himalayas. A unique ceremony and puja by a lama (priest) are like an obligatory before climbing the Himalaya so as to get the blessing and good evil for the safe and effective endeavour.

 

How hard is it to climb Mount Everest?

Mount Everest Expedition is really Challenging. Climbing Mount Everest 8848m. is not easy and climbing into the death zone brings its own challenges. In high-altitude settings, there is less oxygen in the atmosphere, and oxygen doesn’t diffuse into a climber’s blood as well as it would at sea level. That can lead to serious medical problems. The two most common illnesses on Everest are high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), in which constricted blood vessels cause fluid to leak into the lungs’ air sacs; and high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE), in which fluid leaks from blood vessels in the brain, causing headaches, neurologic dysfunction, coma, and eventually death if not treated (and in some cases, even when treated).

Another health risk that affects a Everest climber’s cognition is hypoxia, which is simply when the brain doesn’t get enough oxygen. According to Clement, hypoxia can drastically impair judgment, making it one of the most dangerous Everest risks.

In addition to causing treacherous missteps, hypoxia can drive climbers to push harder and go farther than they normally would—but not in a good way. These “cognitive traps” often happen when a climber gets closer to the top and replace logic and safety with stubborn determination, putting everything at risk to reach their goal. Another word for it? Summit fever.

According to Clement, the cure is setting a strict turnaround time: an ironclad moment when a climber promises to turn around and forego the summit to save their life. Turnaround times are decided before setting foot on Everest, and should be agreed upon between climbers, guides, and expedition leaders. But hypoxia, exposure, and inexperience can encourage climbers to ignore the protocol.

Any climb above 19,000 feet—the altitude known as “the death zone”—will have associated health risks, but there are treatments that can help climbers survive. Medicines include acetazolamide (sold under the brand name Diamox), a diuretic that helps prevent a mild edema, and dexamethasone (brand name Decadron), a steroid used to treat a brain edema and reverse the symptoms of acute mountain sickness. The only true fix for acute mountain sickness is immediate descent.

The best way to stay alive on Everest is proper training, fitness, and organization, but even those steps can’t guarantee safety. Training doesn’t really offset objective hazards like rock falls, ice falls, avalanches, and earthquakes,” said Van Tilburg. “And while we have medicine for altitude illness to help people acclimatize, we don’t have medicines for the myriad other risks on Everest.

 

Mt. Everest History

Since 1921, many mountaineering groups have made different attempts to reach the highest point of the world. However, the gateway to the world’s highest peak was opened only in 1953 after the successful summit made by Sir Edmund Hillary from New Zealand and Tenzing Norgay from Nepal on May 29, 1953 from the Nepal side. After which the Everest region got the worldwide recognition and people were assured that Mt Everest can also be conquered. In the later run, there has been many expedition teams that has successfully led themselves to the top. Since then, it is the most successfully climbed route on the mountain.

 

Best Seasons to Summit

The best time for Mount Everest Expedition is in the spring and autumn for several reasons. Mount Everest’s changeable, extreme climate, in particular, is a determining factor. The summit temperature never rises above freezing, or 0° C (32° F). Its summit temperatures in January average -36° C (-32 ° F) and can drop to -60° C (-76° F), and its average summit temperature in July is -2° F (-19° C). Weather conditions in the high summit is notoriously difficult to predict. Mountaineering expedition offers different seasons in a year. Out of which the spring (March – May) is the most favourable time for the climbers to attempt the climb to the top of the world. The area has the best weather between March and May. The days are warm however during the night time the temperature drops to freezing point. The climbing parts will generally be performed during the night as there is less wind and less obstruction during that time.

 

Fitness level

In order to attempt the Expedition of Everest (29,035’/8848m) you must be in top physical, emotional, and psychological condition. Benchmarks for physical conditioning includes successful previous trips above 20,000ft whenever possible, during which you will have gained experience dealing with gear and equipment, handling extremely cold temperatures and extreme altitude, gaining solid crampon skills both on and off rock, snow and ice, rappelling with a pack on, and using ascenders and jumars on a fixed line. In addition to solid alpine living, snow, and ice climbing skills, you need significant strength endurance, high-altitude tolerance, and strong cardiovascular conditioning.

The Mount Everest Climbing Guides of our team are highly skilled, regularly reviewed and re-trained and recognized for their training and experience throughout the profession. We only select the most experienced guides and staff on this expedition. This is a serious climb and mistakes can have serious consequences. This is why we focus extensively on safety and accident prevention for both clients and guides on our Everest expedition. No expedition is without risk and certainly not one to the highest Mountain of the world. However, we implement rigorous safety standards to minimize the risk. We’d also like to highlight that our guides and staff are all employed under ethical standards.

 

Climbing Route & High Camps

Our journey to the World’s highest mountain “Mount Everest” starts from the time you arrive in Kathmandu from your home land. We always try our best to cater all your needs whilst you are in Kathmandu from accommodations to guiding you with regards to the gears that you would require while you are in the mountain. Then on the third day we shall fly to Lukla the official gateway to Everest and start the trekking journey till Everest Base Camp. It will take a few days to reach base camp as you will need to be well acclimatized to the altitude which keeps on increasing as the days pass.

The actual climbing starts from the day you move from the base camp towards the Khumbu icefall. All the logistics and the technical parts related to the rope fixing and route making are done by our well experienced climbing Sherpas. The Khumbu Icefall is a steep glacier with obvious implication of large crevasses and treacherous unstable seracs making navigation complicated and riddled with high objective danger of falling ice. This is the most dangerous part of the climb. At the beginning of the climbing period, climbing Sherpa set the route through the icefall installing ladders across crevasses and along vertical seracs ice walls for efficient and easy climbing. These arrangements make climb of the Khumbu ice fall possible, efficient and relatively safe especially early morning before the sunrise, when the ice structure is well frozen. Khumbu ice fall is very dangerous in the afternoon due to its western aspect.

There will be a total of four camps on the mountain. The first, at 19,500ft, is situated at the top of the ice fall. This camp functions as an intermediate camp until Camp II which is established at 21,000ft. Camp II will consist of large tents for cooking and dining and several smaller tents for sleeping. Camp II will be our base during the placements of Camp III and Camp IV (23,500ft and 25,912ft respectively). Camp III, which stands at the head of the cirque on the Lhotse face, will consist of three and four main tents. This camp serves as an intermediate camp which climbers will use to reach Camp IV (high camp) on the South Col. Most of our Sherpa’s are able to carry goods directly from Camp II to Camp IV, so large amounts of gear are not needed at Camp III to establish Camp IV. Oxygen will be used above Camp III to help aid climbers reaching high camp before attempting the summit. From Camp IV, we travel along the South East Ridge to the South Summit. From here we traverse for a few hundred meters before reaching the Hillary step and then onto the main summit.

Camp I – 5,945 meters

After the Icefall, the climbers arrive at Camp I, which is located at 19,500 feet. Depending on the type of expedition, Camp I will either be stocked by the climbers as they ascend and descend the Icefall or by Sherpa’s in advance. The area between Camp I and Camp II is known as the Western Cwm or the valley of silence. As the climbers reach Camp II at 21,000 feet, they may be temporarily out of sight of their support at Base camp. Nonetheless, modern communication devises permit the parties to stay connected.

Camp II – 6,402 meters

As the climbers leave Camp II, they travel towards the Lhotse face (Lhotse is a 27,920 ft mountain bordering Everest). The Lhotse face is a steep, shiny icy wall. Though it is not extremely difficult in terms of technicality, one misstep or slip could cost a climber’s life. Indeed, many climbers have lost their lives through such mishaps.

Camp III – 23,500 feet (7,164 meters)

To reach Camp III, climbers must cross the Lhotse Face. Climbing a sheer wall of ice demands skill, strength and stamina. It is so steep and treacherous that many Sherpa’s move directly from Camp II to Camp IV on the South Col, refusing to stay on the Lhotse Face.

Camp IV – 26,300 feet (8000 meters)

As you’re leaving Camp IV…it’s a little bit of a down slope, with the uphill side to the left. There are typically snow on the ledges to walk down on, interspersed with rock, along with some fixed rope. The problem with the rope is that the anchors are bad, and there’s not much holding the rope and a fall could be serious. Fortunately, it’s not too steep, but there are a ton of exposure and people are usually tired when walking down from camp. The rock is a little down sloping to the right as well, and with crampons on, it can be bit tricky with any kind of wind. There’s a little short slope on reliable snow which leads to the top of the Geneva Spur, and the wind pressure gradient across the spur can increase there as you’re getting set up for the rappel. Wearing an oxygen mask here can create some footing issues during the rappel, because it’s impossible to see over the mask and down to the feet. For that reason, some people choose to leave Camp 4 without gas, as it’s easier to keep moving down the Spur when it’s important to see all the small rock steps and where the old feet are going. Navigating down through all of the spaghetti of fixed ropes is a bit of a challenge, especially with mush for brains at that point. One lands on some lower ledges which aren’t so steep, where fixed ropes through here are solid. At this point, it’s just a matter of staying upright, and usually, the wind has died significantly after dropping off the Spur. The route turns hard to the left onto the snowfield that leads to the top of the Yellow Bands.

Camp IV, which is at 26,300ft on the Lhotse face, is typically the climbers’ first overnight stay in the Death Zone. The Death Zone is above 26,000 feet. Though there is nothing magical about that altitude, it is at this altitude that most human bodies lose all ability to acclimate. Accordingly, the body slowly begins to deteriorate and die – thus, the name “Death Zone.” The longer a climber stays at this altitude, the more likely illness (HACE – high altitude cerebral edema – or HAPE – high altitude pulmonary edema) or death will occur. Most climbers will use oxygen to climb and sleep at this altitude and above. Camp IV is the final major camp for the summit push. It is at this point that the climbers make their final preparations. It is also a haven for worn-out climbers on their exhausting descent from summit attempts (both successful and not). Sherpa’s or other climbers will often wait here with supplies and hot tea for returning climbers.

From Camp IV, climbers will push through the Balcony, at 27,500 feet, to the Hillary Step at 28,800 feet. The Hillary Step, an over 70-foot rock step, is named after Sir. Edmond Hillary, who in 1953, along with Tenzing Norgay, became the first people to summit Everest. The Hillary Step, which is climbed with fixed ropes, often becomes a bottleneck as only one climber can climb at a time. Though the Hillary Step would not be difficult at sea level for experienced climbers, at Everest’s altitude, it is considered the most technically challenging aspect of the climb.

 

Summit Attempts

After Camps III and IV are established and all our supplies are in place, we return to Base Camp for a rest. At Base Camp we will organize our summit teams and prepare ourselves for summit attempts. Once we are ready, we return to Advanced Base. If good weather prevails, we move the summit team to Camp III, on day 2/3. Day 3/4 will be summit day for the team. They will start very early that morning and attempt to reach the summit before mid-day. After the summit, they retreat back to the Camp IV and on to Camp III. Next day the team will back to camp II & base camp.
As always, weather plays a major part in all actual summit attempts. We will try as many summits attempts as safely possible as our goal is to put the maximum number of people on the summit. Guides and Sherpa will accompany all summit attempts and oxygen will be used.

 

Summit – 29,028 feet (8848 meters)

Once the climbers ascend the Hillary Step, they slowly and laboriously proceed to the summit at 29,028 feet. The summit stands at the top of the world. Though not the closest place to the sun due to the earth’s curve, it is the highest peak on earth. Due to the decreased air pressure, the summit contains less than one third of the oxygen as at sea level. If dropped off on the summit directly from sea level (impossible in reality), a person would die within minutes. Typically, climbers achieving the great summit will take pictures, gain their composure, briefly enjoy the view, and then return to Camp IV as quickly as possible. The risk of staying at the summit and the exhaustion from achieving the summit is too great to permit climbers to fully enjoy the great accomplishment at that moment. If you have any inquiry, please CONTACT US

 

Outline Itinenary
  • Day 01 :Arrival in Kathmandu Airport and transfer to hotel; (D), O/N Hotel.
  • Day 02 :Half Day sightseeing, Afternoon, Preparing expedition; (B), O/N Hotel.
  • Day 03 :Expedition Briefing in Ministry of Tourism Nepal; (B), O/N Hotel.
  • Day 04 :Fly to Lukla & trek (4 hrs) to Phakding (2640m); (BLD), O/N Lodge :
  • Day 05 :Trek (6 hrs) Phakding - Namche Bazar (3446m); (BLD), O/N Lodge
  • Day 06 :Namche (3446m) & Acclimatization; (BLD), O/N Lodge
  • Day 07 :Trek (5 hrs) Namche - Thyanboche Monastery (3867m); (BLD), O/N Lodge
  • Day 08 :Trek (5 hrs) Thyanboche - Pheriche (4243m); (BLD), O/N Lodge
  • Day 09 :Trek (4 hrs) Pheriche - Lobuche (4930m); (BLD),O/N Lodge
  • Day 10 : Trek (5 hrs) Everest Base Camp (5400m); (BLD), O/N Camping
  • Day 11-58: Climbing Period Everest Summit; (BLD), O/N Camping :
  • Day 59 :Trek (4 hrs) Everest Base Camp - Pheriche; (BLD), O/N Lodge
  • Day 60 :Trek ( 4 hrs) Pheriche - Namche Bazaar; (BLD), O/N Lodge
  • Day 61 :Trek (6 hrs) Namche - Lukla (2800m); (BLD), O/N Lodge
  • Day 62 : Fly Kathmandu & transfer to Hotel; (B), O/N Lodge
  • Day 63 : Rest and leisure day, shopping in Kathmandu, farewell dinner and celebration.; (BD), O/N Lodge
  • Day 64 :Transfer to Airport, Fly back to Home, (B).

Notes:

  •  All above trekking hours and distances are approximate and it’s absolutely for general ideas only.
  • The above data is a guide and standard layout of what we give. Our trek can be customized at your request to suit your particular necessities
  • Your safety is our supreme concern while engaging with Snowy Dream World. Please note that your leader has the authority to adjust or cancel any part of the itinerary if it is estimated required due to safety issues. Every determination will be made to keep to the above itinerary; though, since this journey involves travelling in remote mountainous areas, we cannot assurance that we will not suffer from it. Weather conditions, health condition, unexpected natural disasters can all affect in the itinerary. The leader will try to ensure that the trip runs according to plan, but please be prepared for the happening if required.

Day 01:Arrival in Kathmandu Airport and transfer to hotel; (D), O/N Hotel.

Day 02:Half Day sightseeing, Afternoon, Preparing expedition; (B), O/N Hotel.

Day 03:Expedition Briefing in Ministry of Tourism Nepal; (B), O/N Hotel.

Day 04 :Fly to Lukla & trek (4 hrs) to Phakding (2640m); (BLD), O/N Lodge:

Day 05:Trek (6 hrs) Phakding - Namche Bazar (3446m); (BLD), O/N Lodge

Day 06:Namche (3446m) & Acclimatization; (BLD), O/N Lodge

Day 07:Trek (5 hrs) Namche - Thyanboche Monastery (3867m); (BLD), O/N Lodge

Day 08:Trek (5 hrs) Thyanboche - Pheriche (4243m); (BLD), O/N Lodge

Day 09:Trek (4 hrs) Pheriche - Lobuche (4930m); (BLD),O/N Lodge

Day 10: Trek (5 hrs) Everest Base Camp (5400m); (BLD), O/N Camping

Day 11-58: Climbing Period Everest Summit; (BLD), O/N Camping :

Day 59:Trek (4 hrs) Everest Base Camp - Pheriche; (BLD), O/N Lodge

Day 60:Trek ( 4 hrs) Pheriche - Namche Bazaar; (BLD), O/N Lodge

Day 61:Trek (6 hrs) Namche - Lukla (2800m); (BLD), O/N Lodge

Day 62: Fly Kathmandu & transfer to Hotel; (B), O/N Lodge

Day 63: Rest and leisure day, shopping in Kathmandu, farewell dinner and celebration.; (BD), O/N Lodge

Day 64:Transfer to Airport, Fly back to Home, (B).

Dates and Cost

Trip Dates Trip Price Trip Status
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The given date is available for booking. Anyone traveling solo or with groups are welcome to join.

Join a Group

Traveler(s) have already booked on the given date. Any individual or group can join in.

Limited Space

A lot of people have already booked on the given date. Therefore, we suggest you to hurry as only a few spaces are available.

Sold Out

The given date has reached its full potential. However, if you still want to travel on this particular date, we can organize it for you. Please contact us.

Full Board Service:

Full Bord Service Cost US$ 33499

Included in the Cost
  • All arrival and departure with our assistance in airports.
  • 5 Nights Hotel accommodations in Kathmandu on BB Plan in 5/4 Star category.
  • 1:1 Experienced private climbing Sherpa guide during trek and climb (Everest Summiteers).
  • Flight tickets for Kathmandu-Lukla-Kathmandu to the climbing member and his guide.
  • All camping equipments like camp furniture (table, chairs), kitchenware, kitchen, dining, guest, shower and toilet tents in Advance Base Camp.
  • Three meals a day (BLD-tea-coffee) and twin sharing teahouse accommodation during trek, freshly cooked 3 meals, tea or coffee by professional cook in Base Camp.
  • Baggage allowance for trekking up and down is 60kg: 40kg ratio per person.
  • Everest National Park entry fee (Sagarmatha National Park)
  • Expedition royalty and climbing permit for climbing Mt. Everest in spring.
  • Wages, equipments, medical and accidental Insurances for Sherpa guide and other staffs.
  • Required base camp and high altitude food for climbing member and all involved staffs.
  • Required fixed and dynamic rope during climbing period.
  • Emergency oxygen mask and regulator upon requirement of guest with reliable charge.
  • Each expedition member will have an individual tent in the ABC.
  • Satellite phone carrying by Guide for communication and available for members with the cost of US$ 4 per minute call.
  • 7 Oxygen Bottles (4L) for Climbers and 3 for Sherpa with mask and regulators.
  • Solar panel for light and battery charger in Base Camp.
  • All tents for camp 1, 2, 3 and 4; Ice fall charges.
  • First Aid medical kits for the Group and the staffs.
  • Free assistance service for cargo and duty clearance.
  • Our service charge and Government taxes levied in Nepal.
  • Farewell Dinner in a typical Nepahttp://www.actual-adventure.com/pagegallery/everest-expedition98.jpgli restaurant with domestic culture show in Kathmandu.
  • Special Gifts (T-shirt/Pashmina etc.)
Not Included in the Cost
  • Lunch and Dinner during your stay in Kathmandu (except for the farewell dinner).
  • Items of personal nature and laundry expenses.
  • Expenses of landlines, mobiles, walkie-talkies, satellite phone and internet expenses.
  • Clothing, packing items or bags, personal medical kit, camera/video fees or trekking gears.
  • Any extra expenses arising out of various/unforeseen situations like natural calamities, landslides, political disturbances, strikes, changes in Government regulations, etc
  • Any additional staff other than specified.
  • Rescue, repatriation, medicines, medical tests and hospitalization expenses.
  • Medical and travel Insurance with helicopter search and rescue for climber.
  • Summit bonus for the Sherpa after approaching to the summit. (Minimum US$ 1000.00)
  • Special Permits for walkie-talkies & filming if special camera
  • All personal climbing gears.
  • Nepal custom duty for import of expedition goods.
  • Tips, gifts, souvenirs.
  • Any other item not mentioned in “THE PACKAGE COST INCLUDES” section
Base Camp Service:

Base Camp Service Cost  US$ 19500

Included in the Cost
  • All arrival and departure transfers with our assistance in airports.
  • 5 Nights Hotel accommodations in Kathmandu on BB Plan in 4/5 Star Hotel category.
  • Flight tickets for Kathmandu-Lukla-Kathmandu to the climbing member and his guide.
  • All camping equipments like camp furniture (table, chairs), kitchenware, kitchen, dining, guest, - shower and toilet tents in Advance Base Camp
  • Three meals a day (BLD-tea-coffee) and twin sharing teahouse accommodation during trek, freshly cooked 3 meals, tea or coffee by professional cook in Base Camp.
  • Baggage allowance for trekking up and down is 40kg: 30kg ratio per person.
  • Everest National Park entry fee (Sagarmatha National Park).
  • Expedition royalty and climbing permit for climbing Mt. Everest in Spring.
  • Wages, equipments, medical and accidental Insurances for staffs.
  • Required base camp food for climbing member and all involved staffs.
  • Each expedition member will have an individual tent in the ABC
  • Solar panel for light and battery charger in Base Camp.
  • Satellite phone carrying by Guide for communication and available for members with the cost of US$ 4 per minute call.
  • First Aid medical kits for the Group and the staffs
  • Free assistance service for cargo and duty clearance
  • Our service charge and Government Taxes levied in Nepal.
  • Farewell Dinner in a typical Nepali restaurant with domestic culture show in Kathmandu.
  • Special Gifts (T-shirt/Pashmina etc.).
Not Included in the Cost
  • Lunch and Dinner during your stay in Kathmandu (except for the farewell dinner).
  • Climbing Sherpa Guide, high altitude food and tents above ABC (Camp: 1-2-3-4).
  • Ropes, any other climbing gears and services above ABC (Camp:1-2-3-4)
  • Items of personal nature and laundry expenses
  • Expenses of landlines, mobiles, walkie-talkies or satellite phone and internet expenses
  • Clothing, packing items or bags, personal medical kit, camera/video fees or trekking gears.
  • Any extra expenses arising out of various/unforeseen situations like natural calamities, landslides, political disturbances, strikes, changes in Government regulations, etc
  • Any additional staff other than specified
  • Rescue, repatriation, medicines, medical tests and hospitalization expenses for climbers.
  • Medical and travel Insurance with helicopter search and rescue.
  • Special Permits for walkie-talkies & filming if special camera.
  • Personal climbing gears.
  • Nepal custom duty for import of expedition goods.
  • Tips, gifts, souvenirs.
  • Any other item not mentioned in “THE PACKAGE COST INCLUDES” section.
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